Better Screening Needed for Pediatric Mild Traumatic Brain Injuries

July 22nd 2020

The investigators sought main measures of neurosensory examination based on the sequence of 10 established tests of vestibular-ocular, oculomotor, vestibulospinal and visual functioning.

New research suggests better neurosensory testing is needed for pediatric patients suffering from a mild traumatic brain injury.

A team based in the US and Canada, led by Andrew R. Mayer, PhD, The Mind Research Network/Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute, evaluated the diagnostic and prognostic implications of neurosensory testing during the subacute stage in patients with pediatric mild traumatic brain injuries.

The prospective cohort study included 146 pediatric patients with mild traumatic brain injuries that were evaluated 7.4 ± 2.3 days and approximately 4 months following the injury, compared to 104 age and sex-matched healthy controls at equivalent time points.

The investigators sought main measures of neurosensory examination based on the sequence of 10 established tests of vestibular-ocular, oculomotor, vestibulospinal and visual functioning.

The investigators found the amount of symptom provocation, measured by the positive change from pretest symptomatology, significantly increased in pediatric mild brain injuries relative to the health controls on every subtest 1 week following injuries.

This association was also true for deficits in monocular accommodative amplitude and King-Devick Test errors.

A version of this article was originally published by HCPLive. Visit https://www.mdmag.com/medical-news/screening-pediatric-mild-traumatic-brain-injuries to view the full article.

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