CVS Strengthens Commitment to Diverse Nurse Workforce

February 1st 2016

CVS Health has formed an alliance with 2 leading multicultural nursing organizations to develop a more diverse workforce.

CVS Health has formed an alliance with 2 leading multicultural nursing organizations to develop a more diverse workforce.

The pharmacy and retail clinic giant recently announced strategic partnerships with both the National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) and the National Association of Hispanic Nurses (NAHN) as part of its ongoing effort to foster a diverse workforce that reflects the patients and communities it serves.

Ethnic and racial minority groups currently comprise 37% of the US population and are projected to encompass the majority by 2043, according to the US Census Bureau.

Meanwhile, a 2013 survey jointly conducted by the National Council of State Boards of Nursing and the Forum of State Nursing Workforce Centers revealed that just 19% of nurses come from minority backgrounds.

Nurses who have a proper understanding of the factors associated with disparities in health outcomes in minority communities will prove key in efforts to reduce or eliminate these disparities.

David Casey, vice president of workforce strategies and chief diversity officer of CVS, toldContemporary Clinicthat the partnership’s workplace development programs and educational, training, and colleague engagement strategies will “help bridge the current diverse nursing shortage in the United States and enhance access to quality care for culturally-diverse, underserved populations.”

NBNA President Eric J. Williams, DNP, RN, CNE, similarly explained that a more diverse nursing workforce is beneficial for CVS, NBNA, NAHN, and patients.

“As the country’s multicultural landscape continues to grow, the need for nurses providing culturally-competent health care services in our communities will increase substantially,” he toldContemporary Clinic. “Our members will be able to take advantage of the wide scope of nursing disciplines that CVS has to offer, as well as the increased scholarships offered to minority nurse students.”

Providing more comprehensive, accessible care in underserved communities may help patients take a greater interest in their health, which could improve outcomes and reduce overall costs for the US health system.

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