Expert: Variability is Present in the Efficacy of Cannabis as a Treatment for OCD

Contemporary Clinic Staff

Carrie Cuttler, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Washington State University, discusses some of the limitations present in her research into the use of cannabis to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Contemporary Clinic® interviewed Carrie Cuttler, PhD, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Washington State University, on a recent study she co-authored that was published in the Journal of Affective Disorders on the use of cannabis in treating symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD).

During the discussion, Cuttler addressed the limitations of her research in relation to the analyzed data being pulled from a medical cannabis app, which is mainly used by experienced cannabis users to track their consumption, and thus may not be indicative of its efficacy for the broader public—specifically those who are naïve to cannabis.

Additionally, she explains that the findings may overrepresent individuals who find cannabis to be effective at the treatment of OCD symptoms, because people who don’t find cannabis effective would likely stop using it and subsequently also stop using the app to track their use of the drug.

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