National Organization Brings Awareness to Rosacea Treatments

March 31st 2021
Skylar Kenney, Assistant Editor

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month in an effort to educate the public on this potentially serious disorder that is estimated to affect over 16 million individuals in the United States.

The National Rosacea Society (NRS) has designated April as Rosacea Awareness Month in an effort to educate the public on this potentially serious disorder that is estimated to affect over 16 million individuals in the United States. According to the NRS, even as rosacea treatment and care options become more abundant and sophisticated, many patients with rosacea remain untreated or using treatment plans not best suited for their individual cases.1

Rosacea is a single inflammatory continuum despite having a number of different clinical features that can manifest at different times and in different combinations, according to the recently updated standard classification of the condition. The new standard management options include a comprehensive summary of treatment options for all of rosacea’s phenotypes.1

“Today’s approach to rosacea treatment is different than in the past, when there were few options in our tool kit to address the variable signs and symptoms that may be present in an individual case,” said Linda Stein Gold, MD, director of dermatology clinical research at the Henry Ford Health System, in a prepared statement. “Now that there are effective therapies available to combat each sign and symptom, it is possible to tailor treatment to the needs of each patient.”1

In a survey of 1714 patients with rosacea, 54% of those age 60 years and older reported that they are still using the first prescription therapy ever developed and approved for rosacea, compared to 41% of those under age 60 years. Further, 42% of respondents age 60 years and older had never changed their treatment regimen, compared to only 19% of those under age 60 years.2

The treatment divide between older and younger patients with rosacea extends to other products as well. Respondents under age 60 years were more than twice as likely to be using topical ivermectin than those age 60 years and older (20.7% vs. 9.1%) and 5 times more likely to be using topical oxymetazoline (6.9% vs. 1.4%). Prescription azelaic acid foam was a frequent choice among both age ranges, with 15.1% of those under 60 years and 13% of those 60 years or older using the treatment.2

“As dermatologists, we want patients to be healthy and happy in their skin,” Stein Gold said. “However, if a therapy is not doing its job, it may be time to try a different approach.”1

REFERENCES

  1. Rosacea Awareness Month to highlight broad range of treatment options [news release]. Barrington, IL; National Rosacea Society: February 9, 2021. Accessed February 9, 2021. https://www.rosacea.org/press/2021/february/rosacea-awareness-month-to-highlight-broad-range-of-treatment-options
  2. Survey shows most patients are satisfied with therapy, but more awareness of treatment options is needed. National Rosacea Society. Accessed February 9, 2021. https://www.rosacea.org/rosacea-review/2020/fall/survey-shows-most-rosacea-patients-are-satisfied-with-therapy

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