New Weight Management Guidelines Set for Obstructive Sleep Apnea

September 19th 2018
Krista Rossi

In a study supporting the American Thoracic Society guidelines, weight-loss interventions, have been found to correlate with improvements in obstructive sleep apnea severity, cardiometabolic comorbidities, and quality of life.

Overweight and obesity, which are common yet reversible risks for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), are being targeted by new guidelines released by the American Thoracic Society for management of the sleep condition.

In a study supporting the guidelines, weight-loss interventions, particularly comprehensive lifestyle interventions, have been found to correlate with improvements in OSA severity, cardiometabolic comorbidities, and quality of life, investigator David W. Hudgel, MD said in an intrerview with

.

MD Magazine®

“I observed a few patients referred to comprehensive weight loss programs who lost significant weight—such that their OSA also improved, as well as cardiovascular co-morbidities,” Hudgel said. “Also, it seemed that weight management of OSA was not being presented to OSA patients as a therapeutic option, wasn't being discussed at national meetings, but [are] known to be effective.”

Previously, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was defined as the primary treatment of OSA, as well as related issues like mask fits. Although m

ost patients with OSA are overweight or obese,

weight management was continuously unaddressed.

Continue reading about the new weight management guidelines atMdMag.com.

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