September 3rd 2015

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that between 2001 and 2010 there was a 43% increase emergency room visits for children aged 5 to 14 years.

According toa recent article inNeurology Now, more children are being evaluated for concussion than ever before. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that between 2001 and 2010 there was a 43% increase emergency room visits for children aged 5 to 14 years.

The study also highlights that new research “suggests that head trauma incurred before brains have fully matured—which occurs in the mid-to-late 20s—can have long-term consequences ranging from poor academic performance to depression.”

Instead of pulling children out of sports, which teach positive skills in leadership and boost self-esteem, the study suggests educating children and parents on concussions, including proactive behaviors to avoid concussions and information on how to identify a concussion after an injury has occurred.

Suggested preventive tips include having a preseason evaluation from a health care provider. Clinicians should be sure to followbest practices for sports physicalswhen performing the exam.

Some signs of concussion outlined in the study include blurred vision, headache, dizziness, loss of balance, ringing in the ears, passing out, memory loss, and confusion.

Parents should be encouraged to enforce a rest period for their children and to keep a child sidelined if they are symptomatic. Children should be encouraged to make a safe and gradual return to playing and be aware of their susceptibilities while guarding against repeated blows. Parents are advised to keep risk in perspective and enlist the aid of an athletic trainer if needed. Above all, safe play should be a top priority.

Related Content