December 1st 2015

The results of a recent study show that individuals who reported high efficacy of pharmacologic treatment of their episodic migraines had lower rates of developing chronic migraines.

The results of a recent study published inNeurologyshow that individuals who reported high efficacy of pharmacologic treatment of their episodic migraines had lower rates of developing chronic migraines.

In comparison, individuals who reported moderate to poor efficacy of their pharmacologic treatment had increased rates of developing chronic migraines. Additionally, individuals who reported they were still experiencing pain 2 hours after medication were 50% more likely to experience progression to chronic migraines the following year, compared with individuals who reported being pain-free at least half of the time within the same time period (4.4% vs 2.4% of subjects, respectively).

Similarly, only 1.9% of individuals who achieved maximum treatment efficacy had progression to chronic migraines—a significant difference compared with individuals who had moderate, poor, or very poor efficacy (2.7%, 4.4%, and 6.8%, respectively). None of the medication classes alone were associated with chronic migraine onset; however, triptans showed the most efficacy.

Although limited by self-reporting, these results seem to show a clear association between treatment efficacy for acute migraines and the development of chronic migraines. Effective control of acute migraines shows promise for reducing the risk of developing chronic migraines.

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